Why did Germany attack Verdun in 1916?

The attack on Verdun (the Germans code-named it ‘Judgment’) came about because of a plan by the German Chief of General Staff, von Falkenhayn. He wanted to “bleed France white” by launching a massive German attack on a narrow stretch of land that had historic sentiment for the French – Verdun.

Who won the battle of Verdun 1916?

Battle of Verdun, (February 21–December 18, 1916), World War I engagement in which the French repulsed a major German offensive. It was one of the longest, bloodiest, and most-ferocious battles of the war; French casualties amounted to about 400,000, German ones to about 350,000. Some 300,000 were killed.

What was special about February 1916?

February 21, 1916 (Monday) Battle of Verdun – The Imperial German Army launched one of the biggest offenses of World War I, mobilizing 1.25 million soldiers in 50 divisions to assault and break the French line at Verdun, France, which was being defended by 1.14 million French soldiers.

How bad was the Battle of Verdun?

Despite the Germans’ plan to “bleed France white,” the Battle of Verdun resulted in roughly equal casualties for both sides. The German death toll was 143,000 (out of 337,000 total casualties) while the French lost 162,440 (out of 377,231).

Why was Verdun so important?

Verdun has become the representative memory of World War One for the French, much like the Battle of the Somme in the UK. The battle symbolises the determination of the French Army and the destructiveness of the war.

How long was the longest battle in history?

302 days
The battle lasted for 302 days, the longest and one of the most costly in human history.

What was the biggest thing in 1916?

World Events

  • Battle of Verdunis fought. Battle of the Somme follows in July. Background: World War I.
  • Pershing fails in raid into Mexico in quest of rebel Pancho Villa.
  • Easter Rebellion in Ireland put down by British troops.

What major event happened in 1916?

1916 witnessed two of the most decisive battles of World War One – at Verdun and the Somme. 1916 is seen as the year when the armies of Britain, France and Germany were bled to death.

Was Verdun the longest battle in history?

The Battle of Verdun, 21 February-15 December 1916, became the longest battle in modern history. It was originally planned by the German Chief of General Staff, Erich von Falkenhayn to secure victory for Germany on the Western Front.

What does Verdun symbolize?

The British have the Somme. For the French it is the 10-month battle of Verdun. For both countries, these two epic confrontations came to symbolise the suffering and endurance of the common fighting man.

What was the death toll of the Battle of Verdun?

Written By: Battle of Verdun, (February 21–December 18, 1916), World War I engagement in which the French repulsed a major German offensive. It was one of the longest, bloodiest, and most-ferocious battles of the war; French casualties amounted to about 400,000, German ones to about 350,000. Some 300,000 were killed.

Where was the French fort in the Battle of Verdun?

Location of French forts in the area around Verdun, 1916, taken from the Encyclopædia Britannica ‘s 13th edition (1926). As early as January 1916, French airmen had detected German preparations for the Verdun offensive, and on February 11, 1916, a French intelligence officer discovered a buildup of German troops on the right bank of the Meuse.

What was the role of Verdun in World War 1?

Verdun was too far east to play a part in the offensives of 1915. The only role Verdun was able to play in the offensives of 1915 was as a source of artillery guns. This was very different from the role Verdun might have been expected to play before the war.

What did Falkenhayn use in the Battle of Verdun?

Here Falkenhayn planned to use more than 1200 artillery pieces to destroy French units, whilst making limited use of German infantry to minimise his own casualties. French troops manning a captured German Maxim MG 08 machine gun (mounted on a sledge) at Fort Douaumont, Verdun.