Which sentence is an example of an objective?

Which sentence is an example of an objective?

Dean tried to be as objective as possible and let the report speak for itself. Success will depend on objective criteria and visualizing the process. The primary objective is to achieve best practice in long term interoperability between its systems.

What is a possessive sentence?

The possessive form is used with nouns referring to people, groups of people, countries, and animals. It shows a relationship of belonging between one thing and another. To form the possessive, add apostrophe + s to the noun. If the noun is plural, or already ends in s, just add an apostrophe after the s.

What is a possessive form examples?

I have been invited to the boss’s house for dinner. The trainer flipped a fish into the walrus’s open mouth. Plural nouns ending in an s simply take an apostrophe at the end to form a possessive noun. Of course, there are many plural nouns in English that are irregular and do not end in s.

What are the 12 possessive pronouns?

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs.

What is the difference between genitive and possessive?

As adjectives the difference between possessive and genitive is that possessive is of or pertaining to ownership or possession while genitive is (grammar) of or pertaining to that case (as the second case of latin and greek nouns) which expresses origin or possession it corresponds to the possessive case in english.

What is possessive case with example?

Using Apostrophes to Form Possessive NounsTypeExamplePossessive Casesingular noundogdog’s dinnerplural noundogsdogs’ dinnersingular noun ending -sChrisChris’ hat or Chris’s hatplural noun not ending -sPeoplePeople’s rights

What are genitive and dative cases?

Genitive: The possession case; used to indicate ownership. Accusative: The direct object case; used to indicate direct receivers of an action. Dative / Instrumental: The indirect object and prepositional case; used to indicate indirect receivers of action and objects of prepositions.